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Sep 23 2008

North Carolina Fishing Reports: North Carolina Offshore Fishing and Inshore Fishing- Updated September 23, 2008

Published by at 4:55 pm under Fishing Reports,Northeast Fishing Reports

New York Fishing Reports, New Jersey Fishing Reports, Rhode Island Fishing Reports, Connecticut Fishing Reports, Massachusetts Fishing Reports,Maine Fishing Reports, New Hampshire Fishing Reports, Northeast Fishing Reports, Northeast Saltwater Fishing Reports, New York Saltwater Fishing Reports, New Jersey Saltwater Fishing Reports, Rhode Island Saltwater Fishing Reports, Connecticut Saltwater Fishing Reports, Massachusetts Saltwater Fishing Reports,Maine Saltwater Fishing Reports, New Hampshire Saltwater Fishing Reports, New York Striped Bass Fishing Reports, New Jersey Striped Bass Fishing Reports, Rhode Island Striped Bass Fishing Reports, Connecticut Striped Bass Fishing Reports, Massachusetts Striped Bass Fishing Reports,Maine Striped Bass Fishing Reports, New Hampshire Striped Bass Fishing Reports, Northeast Striped Bass Fishing ReportsFINANCIAL MARKETS AND FISHERIES…
Indeed, there was much turmoil on Wall Street this week.   I won’t even begin to act like I know all or even some of the details on how we came dangerously close to a total collapse of our financial system, but what I find odd is how one of the oldest financial institutions on Wall Street went under.  The fact that a company with that much money and with so many smart people working there didn’t have a plan for this sort of thing is beyond me.

I just don’t understand how it could have happened.   Actually, that’s not true.  I totally get how it happened.  Essentially, Wall Street operates on the principles of greed, yet with such greed often comes a lack of precaution.  Greed is not entirely a bad thing.  Without it, the system wouldn’t work.  But when that greed gets to the point where you aren’t cautious about the future then, yes, someone needs to step in and regulate.

I’m sure you see where I’m going with this by now.  The above is exactly the case with fisheries management.   Often I hear commercial as well as some recreational fishing organizations saying that they are the ones that have an interest in keeping stocks healthy, and thus they should be the ones calling the shots.  Over the years, we’ve seen how badly such a system works.  The Tragedy of the Commons dictates that greed wipes out foresight and precaution when a public resource is available to most everyone.

Enter the Fishery Management Council system.  For decades these councils made up primarily of commercial fishermen and recreational industry representatives have managed on or over the margins, putting their own economic well being before the overall health of stocks they were appointed to protect.

It took a lawsuit in 2000 to make these folks manage fish in such a way where stocks may actually rebuild.  Still, even that hasn’t worked as conservation primarily took a back seat to socio economic considerations.  With the reauthorization of the Magnuson Stevens Act in 2006 we may have actually fixed the problem.  Councils are now required to heed the science.  The Act even went a step further calling for precautionary measures in the form of Annual Catch Limits.   The verdict is still out though.

We will see if such requirements are followed in the coming years or if the councils figure out ways to get around them.  But one thing is abundantly clear to me in all of this.  If the Councils do indeed continue to manage on the margins and essentially allow continued overfishing in the face of the best available science, NOAA Fisheries must step in and make the hard decisions that the Councils will not.

I’m a firm believer that Council and stakeholder input is critically important to the fisheries management process (I’m such a believer that I recently was appointed to the Mid Atlantic Council),  but when such input is self-serving, and ignores both the best scientific evidence and the mandate of law, NOAA Fisheries must step up and act in the greater public interest.

Fishing Reports

There’s still a bluefin bight off the Jersey Coast but it consists of mostly troll caught fish.  Lots of Mahi out there as well and they are eager to take flies and jigs.  Inshore the action really picked up this week on the bass and bluefish front.  And….  Some good albie fishing just a bit off the coast.  In the New York Bite area, we had very good false albacore concentrations.  Guys were hooking up left and right before all that east wind set in on Friday.  Still a ton of bay anchovies around, so I expect them to reappear once things settle.   The mullet are around in force.  There has been some exceptional fishing on the breaking sandbars as bass and bluefish chase the mullet in the white water.   Jamaica and Raritan Bay are uncharacteristically slow.  Still, lots of peanut bunker in both these areas, so as soon as we get some cooler weather it should go off.  Across Long Island, expect to find concentrations of both albies and bass in and around the inlets.  Out in Montauk, there were major bass blitzes last week and the albies were on fire as well.  Now is definitely the time to be hitting Montauk.  Things are picking up on the North Shore also, but mainly just schoolies.  Both Connecticut and Rhode Island have good concentrations of albies in the traditional spots.  Up in Mass it’s been hit or miss as the fall run still doesn’t seem to have taken hold yet.  Some scattered pods of albies in and around the Cape but I hear they’ve been tough.

New Jersey Fishing Reports

Capt. Bryan DiLeo from Iowa Fortune Guide service checks in with this Southern New Jersey Report.  Check it out:
“Man O Man” does it feel good to be back on the water once again. The past two weeks dished up action, both with Bass in the SJ back country as well as a good Dolphin bite offshore. I can see that the stars are aligning in the back country for what looks to be an explosive upcoming fall. On the right tides brief glimpses into the future months ahead can be seen with large schools of peanut bunker, rain bait, and mullet balling up for survival triggering mini blitzes through out the shallows. These feeding frenzies of Bluefish with Bass mixed in will soon be turning into blitzes of Bass with Bluefish mixed in, and can be found popping up unannounced at any time throughout the months ahead. September is always an interesting transitional time in the shallows when an all out Bass blitz can blow up right in front of your eyes at any time. This action, combined with the lack of summer boat traffic, often allows us the ability to stay on top of Bass for unlimited amounts of time, offering up some fast paced action. As far as the offshore scene, I will be splitting my time between the backcountry and out front for Albies and Dolphin as was the case Saturday taking advantage of the picture perfect weather window giving us great ocean conditions. With the light offshore winds it offered a good opportunity for a smooth run offshore for some quality run and gun Dolphin action with fish up to 10lbs, and better yet, we never saw another boat all day. This type of action should stick with us though the next two months. If you are looking to get in on the fall action email me for available dates. My September is pretty much full, so it is now all about October and November and it would be my suggestion to get in while the gettin’s good. Now that I am back on the water full time my weekly reports will resume flowing on a weekly basis once again.

New York Fishing Reports

Capt. David Azar from One More Cast Charters checks in with this Lower New York Harbor report:

“THE FALL RUN HAS BEGUN!!! Fishing in the New York Bight has been amazing!  A huge crop of stripers has moved in and they are feeding heavily on the abundant buildup of bait in the area.  The stripers, which have been averaging 25″, are mixed in with bluefish to 9 pounds.  But Dr. Ron Mizrahi was out at the Shrewsbury Rocks on Sunday and reported bigger blues and bigger bass in that area.  Lehman Bros., AIG, and Merrill Lynch were not the only big news this weekend, the really big news was the arrival of the albies on Sunday.  While this captain has yet to get one in the boat (though John Maples came awfully close, see below) Captains John McMurray and Chris Hessert both had banner sessions Sunday and today.  Right now catching a slam is almost a sure thing so if you have been waiting for the albies to show now is the time!
Last Thursday I spent the morning searching far and wide for albies with no luck.  On the way home, at 2:30 p.m., I found the stripers and blues in a favorite spot.  Every drift produced several fish on both flies and artificials.  Fishing alone for about 2 hours I landed close to 20 fish.”


From the North Shore, Bob Giordano has this to say about the week’s action:

“Hey John, still bluefish in and around the harbors. Not showing in any visual way. Most hook ups have been blind casting larger crease flies and gurglers. No news on the Albie/ Bonito front. Our club is having an outing this Sunday with five or six boats running about so hopefully one of our members will find them.
The calender last year had them in around our local points to the sound.  Concerning is the lack of large bunker and even the peanut pods seem to be much thinner then usual. We’ll see how things get rolling as we officially move into Autumn.”


From Montauk, Capt. David Blinken from North Flats Guiding checks in with this report. 

New York Fishing Reports, New Jersey Fishing Reports, Rhode Island Fishing Reports, Connecticut Fishing Reports, Massachusetts Fishing Reports,Maine Fishing Reports, New Hampshire Fishing Reports, Northeast Fishing Reports, Northeast Saltwater Fishing Reports, New York Saltwater Fishing Reports, New Jersey Saltwater Fishing Reports, Rhode Island Saltwater Fishing Reports, Connecticut Saltwater Fishing Reports, Massachusetts Saltwater Fishing Reports,Maine Saltwater Fishing Reports, New Hampshire Saltwater Fishing Reports, New York Striped Bass Fishing Reports, New Jersey Striped Bass Fishing Reports, Rhode Island Striped Bass Fishing Reports, Connecticut Striped Bass Fishing Reports, Massachusetts Striped Bass Fishing Reports,Maine Striped Bass Fishing Reports, New Hampshire Striped Bass Fishing Reports, Northeast Striped Bass Fishing Reports“The blitz continues! That is the title of this weeks fishing report. The falling tide and early mornings rule.
As long as the weather holds up the fishing is off the chart and the fishing seems to recover quickly after a weather event. Bay anchovies are the primary bait. Get out there and revel awesome angling before its too late!” 


And lastly, we’ve got a day by day this week from Capt. Ken Rafferty:

“SEPT 8th…Afternoon…Gene Sills…Fly-fishing.
The water was still a little cloudy from Hanna’s winds but as I headed east from Eastern Plains Point I found clear water and lots of big Bluefish on the surface. There were some Albies slashing through the water but everytime we tied on an Albie flie the Blues would bite it off. Gene was very happy landing a dozen or so of those 12 lb. Bluefish.
SEPT 9th…Morning…Frank and Donald Oconner, brothers…Spin Tackle.
I headed back to Eastern Plains Pt and found cleaner water and some Stripers among the rocks. Both Frank and Don hooked up with 8 to 10 lb. fish for a total of four Stripers. We then spotted a few Albies that were once again mixed in with lots of big Bluefish. Don hooked up first with an Albie…the line screamed out but it was cut off by a Bluefish. We were not able to hook-up with anymore Albies but both anglers landed lots of large Bluefish using surface poppers.
SEPT 10th…Afternoon…Larry Goldman…Fly-fishing.
This would be larry’s first time saltwater fly-fishing.
Today I headed out to the land of giants and to my surprise I had big Bluefish finning on the surface. On Larry’s third cast his flie landed right ahead of a fish, he stripped once and it was devoured immediately and the fight was on. This Blue took off and cleared the water five times just like a Tarpon, blowing out it’s gills while tail walking and shaking it’s head trying to lose the hook. About 10 to 15 minutes later we had it aboard, it weighed in at 14 lbs.
Larry landed four more Blues the same way but most of them were in the 10 lb class. Before heading back I made one stop at the tip of Bostwick Pt. and Larry was able to land a small Striper of about 6 lbs.
SEPT 11th…Morning…John DeMeritt…Spin Tackle.
We had a nasty morning with 15 mph east winds and so I headed into Cherry Harbor to stay sheltered and I also knew there had been large schools of full sized Bunker there for about five weeks and when we were about a half mile from the island I spotted the first school that measured about a hundred feet long by 50 feet across. We could see large fish feeding on them from below but couldn’t make out what they were. I gave John a rod with a lead-head jig, the kind you use with a rubber slugo except we didn’t put on a slugo.
John cast out and retrieved as fast as he could and would snag a Bunker. As soon as he had a Bunker hooked it would attract the attention of the predators below and sure enough, Slam! …fish on. These were those large 12 lb. Bluefish eating off the ball of Bunker down deep. John kept repeating this and kept getting hooked up with Blue after Blue. I had tried this same thing a few weeks ago seeing large Stripers below the Bunker on a calm day with full sun overhead and calm water but they would take my Bunker, they wanted the fish that were in the ball.
SEPT 11th…Afternoon…Jerry Lodge…Fly-fishing.
The wind had died down to about three mph and so I headed out to Montauk Point and in forty minutes we were surrounded by False Albacore and schools of Stripers all on the surface under the light house.
It was just to much for words as fish after fish was landed by Jerry. The Stripers were all in the 10 lb. class and the Albies were 6 to 7 lb. class. By five thirty pm. we were back in East Hampton. Jerry said he was exhausted and stated he landed 8 Albies and 14 Stripers plus 2 Bluefish.
SEPT 12th…Full-day…Michael Salzhauer…Fly-fishing.
As we headed to Montauk in Michael’s 28 ft Edgewater I told him that if the conditions were right, be prepared to fish until you drop.
It was a little sloppy with a south wind of about 15 to 20 mph but it was worth it. I think it was the best day of fishing either one of us had ever seen. It started out with schools of Striped Bass everywhere you looked. They were right along side the boat….you could reach down with a gaff and lift them into the boat if you wanted to. Michael had landed at least twenty of these Stripers in a row and had to take a few breaks in between so I would grab a rod and land a few. By 11:00 am the Stripers had gathered into small schools and were scattered but not gone. Then the Albies came slashing through the water eating everything you offered them. One after another Michael was hooked up with these speedsters as the line screamed out of the reel. Every once in a while he would hook-up and know it wasn’t an Albie as the rod tip would shake, Bluefish. Michael had six grand slams that we know of….but who’s counting…lolol.
We were back in East Hampton by five pm. Hosing down the boat.
SEPT 13th…Morning…Stan Warshawsky…Fly-fishing.
Since I don’t have the boat at Montauk I have been leaving from East Hampton in the Pathfinder. The 27 ft Rambo is having work done on the engine.
Stan and I were under the light house at 9:00 am as he was landing his first 10 Lb. Striper. The conditions on the water were a little better then the previous day but you had to be careful in the 22 Pathfinder with it’s low gunnels. Stan managed to land 7 Stripers in the 8 to 10 lb. class…. three Bluefish and 2 Albies by 11:30.
SEPT 14th….took the day off…no fishing.
SEPT 15th…30 mph winds from Hurricane Ike…no fishing.”


Connecticut and Rhode Island Fishing Reports

From the Eastern Connecticut area, Capt. Sandy Noyes from Rumrunner Charters checks in with this report:
New York Fishing Reports, New Jersey Fishing Reports, Rhode Island Fishing Reports, Connecticut Fishing Reports, Massachusetts Fishing Reports,Maine Fishing Reports, New Hampshire Fishing Reports, Northeast Fishing Reports, Northeast Saltwater Fishing Reports, New York Saltwater Fishing Reports, New Jersey Saltwater Fishing Reports, Rhode Island Saltwater Fishing Reports, Connecticut Saltwater Fishing Reports, Massachusetts Saltwater Fishing Reports,Maine Saltwater Fishing Reports, New Hampshire Saltwater Fishing Reports, New York Striped Bass Fishing Reports, New Jersey Striped Bass Fishing Reports, Rhode Island Striped Bass Fishing Reports, Connecticut Striped Bass Fishing Reports, Massachusetts Striped Bass Fishing Reports,Maine Striped Bass Fishing Reports, New Hampshire Striped Bass Fishing Reports, Northeast Striped Bass Fishing Reports“It’s been a busy week on the Sound for us. There hasn’t been any consistent action around Watch Hill and other local areas so we’ve been going over to Montauk. Every day has brought something different. One day The albies are in thick and hungry. Another day there are massive schools of Stripers.Everyday brings large schools of Bluefish. Some days its a little bit of everything. The water temps and bait are holding pretty steady. Not much news from the Rhode Island beaches although there is some bait starting to show.”

Massachusetts Fishing Reports

Capt. David Rimmer checks in with a Newburyport report:

“The fall is when anglers should expect to see schools of surface feeding striped bass in the estuaries, as well as along the beaches and rocky shorelines, and finally it is starting to happen up here north of Beantown. My own trips combined with reports from other guides and friends are all suggesting that the fall run is underway. The bait – silversides mostly, not much of any peanut bunker yet – has been around for weeks but you did well to find a few bass and bluefish until the last week or so. Bluefish do not seem as abundant now but there has been a good push of new fish recently, mostly in the 18-24 inch range, although several days ago I got on a school of fish in the 30-40 inch range that were feeding up top. Now that is good stuff! Up this way we hope to keep fishing until mid-October, so with any luck and decent weather, all signs are pointing to some good bass fishing for the rest of the season.”


Wow!  On that note, I’m gonna sign off.  See ya on the water…

Captain John McMurray, One More Cast Charters, New York Fishing Reports, New Jersey Fishing Reports, Rhode Island Fishing Reports, Connecticut Fishing Reports, Massachusetts Fishing Reports,Maine Fishing Reports, New Hampshire Fishing Reports, Northeast Fishing Reports, Northeast Saltwater Fishing Reports, New York Saltwater Fishing Reports, New Jersey Saltwater Fishing Reports, Rhode Island Saltwater Fishing Reports, Connecticut Saltwater Fishing Reports, Massachusetts Saltwater Fishing Reports,Maine Saltwater Fishing Reports, New Hampshire Saltwater Fishing Reports, New York Striped Bass Fishing Reports, New Jersey Striped Bass Fishing Reports, Rhode Island Striped Bass Fishing Reports, Connecticut Striped Bass Fishing Reports, Massachusetts Striped Bass Fishing Reports,Maine Striped Bass Fishing Reports, New Hampshire Striped Bass Fishing Reports, Northeast Striped Bass Fishing Reports

Capt. John McMurray

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