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Archive for the 'Striped Bass' Category

Jan 16 2020

East Coast Saltwater Fishing Reports updated Jan 16, 2020

Happy New Year🎉 Some monster striped bass pictures in this weeks fishing reports. Let me give you a taste of what we’re talking about…

Chesapeake Bay Maryland fishing reports big striped basss
Yea, it might be a cold winter, but fishing in the Chesapeake Bay is HOT🔥
Beautiful winter striped bass caught with a JLS Custom “Purple lady” rod fishing with Capt. Jamie of Eastern Shore Light Tackle Charters

Here’s what happening…

Lateral Line Podcast Update
Late last year I sent out a survey to see if readers would like to have these fishing reports in a podcast. I received an overwhelming “Yes”. So…

It’s happening. Right now I’m waiting on approval from Apple, once that happens, hopefully by next Thursday, we’ll be live on Apple, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify and TuneIn.

Here’s our icon, what do you think? Post in the comments at the end of fishing reports, way below👇

Fishing Report Podcast Fishing Journal by Lateral Line
Lateral Line Fishing Podcast icon

Thanks for all the feedback and support.🙏

Here’s what you can expect on a weekly basis…

  1. First and foremost we’ll be bringing you fishing reports from along the east coast, from New York to North Carolina, Maryland-Virginia Chesapeake Bay and it’s tributaries.
  2. Tips on lures and set-ups that are working
  3. New fishing products news and reviews
  4. Conservation news (looking for someone to bring us this weekly, hopefully will find someone soon)

I’ll post here and email you, if you’re on our email list, as soon as we go live.👍

On to this weeks fishing reports, hot areas are Chesapeake Bay with big striped bass.

New York Fishing Reports

Capt John McMurray from One More Cast reported that is all is quite right now in New York waters. John’s getting some rest after long solid 2019 season😁

Capt David Blinken from North Flats Guiding is off the water right now. His report: “skiing” 🏂

New Jersey Fishing Reports

Beach Haven Charter Fishing Association (BHFCA) reports all is slow right now, their gearing up for 2020.

Maryland Chesapeake Bay
Fishing Reports

Moving down the east coast to the upper Chesapeake Bay. Capt. Jamie from Eastern Shore Light Tackle Charters clients have been catching some BIG striped bass.

Maryland Chesapeake Bay Fishing reports January fishing light tackle
Another one of many monster striped bass caught this past week.
Moster rockfish fishing reports in Maryland Chesapeake Bay
Another nice bass

Capt Walleye Pete from Four Seasons Guide Service reports a full fish finder. Big arches= big striped bass…

Striped Bass Fishing Reports Maryland Chesapeake Bay Walleye Pete Four Seasons Guide Service
Striped bass covering up this fish finder!
Rockfishing Maryland Chesapeake Bay Fishing Reports Walleye Pete Four Seasons Guide Service
Just one of many nice stripers caught with Capt. Pete this past week.

Virginia Chesapeake Bay
Fishing Reports

We’re adding in fishing report from Buzz’s Marina for 2020. They’re technically located on the tip of Maryland, but given they fish as much Virginia waters, we’re putting them here😁

Mike from Buzz’s has been tearing the striped bass up man! I’ll let the picture tell the story…

Virginia Chesapeake Bay Fishing Reports Striped Bass Fishing Buzz's Marina
Can Michael find them or what? He’s having a blast catching and releasing some nice rockfish on light tackle!💥

Moving south to the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel and Virginia Offshore action, Dr. Ken reports:(this from last week, but still fresh)

Charles Southall sent me a message saying that he was thinking about running across the bay for some catch and release fishing for rockfish.

I met him, David Brabrand and Gabe Sava at Dare Marina in the morning. It was my first time on the new Special Kate.

It was foggy all day and it rained but it was calmer than predicted. I was surprised by the number of boats near Cape Charles for catch and release fishing. Back when rockfish were crazy good: birds raining out of the sky, catches limited only by how many you could stand to crank, we’d go over there in January and never see another boat.

Today, we had a good amount of company trying to catch some fish to release. We had two bites and held on to one. I happened to be by the rod and got to catch the first rockfish on this Special Kate. The first one was good one and hopefully, it will just be the first of many. 

Virginia Fishing Reports Tidewater Offshore Striped Bass Fishing

North Carolina Fishing Reports

Pirates Cove Fishing Marina latest report from Jan 10, 2020;

We enjoyed the warmer weather today, here at Pirate’s Cove Marina! We had one boat from our offshore fleet go out and they reported the Tuna bite was still on with catches of Yellowfin and Blackfin!!

North Caroline Fisheries reports:

North Carolina Fishing Reports
North Carolina Fishing Reports Region Map

North Carolina Northern Region Winter Overview

Offshore Fishing
Anglers can catch plenty of yellowfin tuna, as well as wahoo, in the winter when conditions permit. Atlantic bluefin tuna have made their presence known and offer a great opportunity. Offshore bottom fishing can be excellent in the winter, as well. In midrange waters, anglers target striped bass (if they migrate to North Carolina waters), and red drum fishing can be very good during warmer periods. Anglers should find a regional fishing website that reports daily catches or contact a local tackle shop for up-to-date fishing reports. Anglers may want to improve their chances of a great day of fishing by using the services of a charter boat or guide.

Inlets/Sounds/Bays
When weather permits, fishing will be heavy with anglers targeting striped bass. Striped bass fishing was good this fall at Mann’s Harbor and surrounding areas and in the Roanoke, Croatan and northern Pamlico sounds. Fishing was especially good near bridges or any other structure. Striped bass anglers should check out the Wanchese Harbor, as well. Striped bass fishing is managed through a quota, so anglers should also check with the Division of Marine Fisheries before heading out. Other good winter catches are spotted seatrout and red drum. Good places to fish include around the bridge at Pirates Cove, barrier islands, Roanoke Sound and Oregon Inlet’s Green Island Slough and rock jetty. Fishing is generally best from pre-dawn to mid-morning hours, then again just before dark.

Piers/Shore
Piers are currently closed. Most will re-open around Easter. Beach anglers may have a tough time fishing this time of year due to rough surf and adverse weather. But when conditions permit, some of the largest red drum are taken from the surf in the winter. Bluefish blitzes can happen this time of year, but it’s been a long time since North Carolina observed this kind of activity. There is also the possibility of some excellent speckled trout surf fishing on the beaches from Rodanthe southward.

North Carolina Central Region Winter Overview

Offshore Fishing
There will be plenty of excellent fishing opportunities onboard charter boats during the winter. The central area of the coast has become known for its Atlantic bluefin tuna fishery. Usually, cold weather has an impact on when those giants show up, but this season they are already here. How long they stay around will depend on the weather, as well. Other offshore species, such as king mackerel, yellowfin tuna and wahoo, will be available to anglers fishing the Gulf Stream. Bottom fishing for a variety of reef fishes is also excellent during the winter months. Several head boats operate throughout the year. Some of the best snapper and grouper catches occur during the winter. Extended and overnight fishing trips are offered. Also, bluefin tuna head boat trips are sometimes offered. Anglers on private boats can enjoy many of the same opportunities as those fishing on charter boats. Anglers fishing offshore will have access to excellent catches of king mackerel, snapper, grouper and other reef fish. In past years, with very cold temperatures, striped bass appeared on Cape Lookout Shoals. Anglers shouldn’t forget about the fishing on the eastern side of Cape Lookout. December should provide good false albacore fishing

Inlets/Sounds/Bays
Speckled trout fishing was good this fall and there were plenty of nice trout around as well. The upper creeks of the White Oak, New, Neuse, Bay, Pamlico and Pungo rivers should offer good speckled trout fishing. Creek fishing for speckled trout is a specialized skill, and anglers may want to consider using a local guide to improve fishing opportunities.

Piers/Surf
Most piers close for the winter season. Some may allow access, but catches will be limited. Shore fishing activity will be limited, as well.

North Carolina Southern Region Winter Overview

Ocean
Offshore fishing can be fantastic during the winter months. Bluewater trolling for wahoo can be very good, and vertical jigging and top water fishing for blackfin tuna is outstanding when weather conditions allow. African pompano and good numbers of cobia will bite on jigs, as well. King mackerel fishing can be outstanding around Frying Pan Tower. Anglers should look for king mackerel in water temperatures around 67 degrees Fahrenheit and warmer. Bottom fishing for black sea bass, groupers and other various reef fish is good in the winter months.

Inlets/Sounds/Bays
As the water temperature falls, things begin to slow down a little. Most anglers target trout and drum in the winter. Most of the trout action will take place around Masonboro and Little River rock jetties. Those targeting red drum will find the bays and creeks behind Bald Head Island productive. Also, the striped bass fishery in the Cape Fear River heats up during the winter months. The most productive striped bass fishing occurs around downtown Wilmington.

Piers/Shore
Shore fishing is very limited in the winter months. Most piers close after Thanksgiving weekend and do not reopen until March. For those that do stay open, catches likely will be limited to puffers, skates and dog sharks. Fishing for puffers can be very good on piers during the winter months.

Viewers Submitted Fishing Pictures

Nothing this week…SEND ME YOUR PICS Brandon at Lateral Line Co dot com.

Fishing Report Summary

Well, that’s a wrap for this week. Not too shabby for January fishing.

Hope you have a great week and 🤞 on our podcast launch next week.

Please pass on these fishing reports to anyone else you think would enjoy them.

If you are a fishing guide and want to have your fishing reports included please send me an email and I will let you know what I need from you. Brandon at Lateral Line Co dot com.

– Brandon

Lateral Line Blog Homepage

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Jul 11 2012

Cool Fishing T Shirt

Fishing T Shirt by Tidal Fish Chasing Striped BassWe always like to give a shout out to those that pick up the Lateral Line brand. Tidal Fish picked us up in their online fishing store and we found something in addition to their site worth giving a shout out. Their striped bass fishing t-shirt  jumped out at us as pretty cool design. If you are into the saltwater inshore fishing scene and chase striped bass this t-shirt is worth a look. It comes in short sleeve and long sleeve. And while you are surfing their online store make sure you check out the hot new performance fishing t-shirt designs by Lateral Line. They have them up in their fishing shop before we do…. ouch that hurts man. Keep an eye out for them here on the Lateral Line soon.

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Feb 23 2011

Report Finds Menhaden Decline Effects Health and Migration of Striped Bass

Striped Bass Patterns change because of lack of menhadenAn ongoing study by the Chesapeake Bay Ecological Foundation (CBEF) determined that low numbers of Atlantic menhaden, the predominate striped bass prey species within the Chesapeake Bay and along the Atlantic coast,  have affected the growth, health and migration of striped bass.  Since 2004, the CBEF, with assistance from East Carolina University, has examined over 7,000 striped bass from the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean along the Virginia and North Carolina coast.
Data collected by this study indicates that malnutrition observed in 16” to 24” striped bass from Maryland’s section of the Chesapeake Bay (upper Bay) is a consequence of ecological depletion (insufficient numbers of young menhaden less than 10” and bay anchovy).  Malnutrition is also exacerbated by low numbers of other forage species.  CBEF studies of resident and migratory striped bass determined that in most years since 2005, menhaden constituted over 75% of their diet (by weight).  Within the Chesapeake Bay, striped bass growth decreased, a significant percentage of striped bass have mycobacterial infections and striped bass natural mortality rates have risen.
Diminishing striped bass numbers culminated in threatened species status in the upper Bay in 1984 and a fishing moratorium in 1985.  In 1990 the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC), which is responsible for the management of menhaden and striped bass, partially reopened the fishery in state waters and in 1995 declared striped bass fully recovered.  Within the upper Bay a harvest cap was imposed for the first time and the 14” minimum size was raised to 18” (4-5 years of age).  This size limit protected more than 90% of immature female striped bass which historically emigrated to coastal waters and became ocean residents before reaching 18”; only re-entering the Chesapeake Bay on spring spawning migrations after reaching maturity at age 6 or older.  Within ocean waters the minimum size was set at 28” to allow most females to spawn at least once before reaching harvest size.  These actions resulted in a greatly expanded striped bass population, and intensified feeding on menhaden and adult bay anchovy in ocean waters.
During the early 1990s, coincidental with burgeoning striped bass predation on menhaden and bay anchovy, adult menhaden were severely overfished off New England concurrent with intensive fishing by the purse seine reduction fishery (large scale harvest of fish for processing into products such a fish oil and meal) in the Virginia section of the Chesapeake Bay (lower Bay) and in ocean areas from New Jersey to North Carolina.  The Omega Protein Corporation currently owns and operates the only remaining menhaden reduction fishery.  This fishery, the largest on the Atlantic coast, competes with striped bass, fish eating birds and many marine predators.  During 2009 and 2010, approximately 500 million young, immature menhaden (less than 10”), about 43% of the total numbers landed, were harvested in the lower bay and nearby coastal waters by Omega Protein.  These immature menhaden are crucial to the diet of the Bay’s malnourished 16” to 24” striped bass and are supposed to be protected according to ASMFC’s ecological objectives in their Interstate Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic Menhaden.
This study revealed that large numbers of striped bass greater than 28”, predominately females, which historically migrated from summer habitat in New England waters during the fall to feeding grounds in coastal ocean waters off Virginia and North Carolina, now arrive in the upper Bay during late fall and remain through the spring spawning season – a previously undocumented event.  This study also documented a significant increase in the population of immature female striped bass in the upper Bay during October through December of 2010.  These females represented 25% of striped bass in the 18” to 24” range; two times higher than the 12% average in 2008 & 2009 and four times higher than the 6% average in 2006 & 2007.  Immature females in this size range normally inhabit ocean waters and are protected by the 28” minimum size limit.  However, within the Chesapeake Bay, immature female striped bass greater than 18” can be harvested by recreational and commercial fisheries.
Diet analyses, body fat indices and the unprecedented shift in established feeding patterns by migratory striped bass indicate that menhaden and bay anchovy are severely depleted on their coastal feeding grounds.  Consequently, migratory striped bass that over-winter in the Chesapeake Bay are competing with resident striped bass for menhaden of all sizes.
ASMFC decisions that address menhaden overfishing must also resolve the fundamental problem – ecological depletion of Atlantic menhaden in the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean.

An ongoing study by the Chesapeake Bay Ecological Foundation (CBEF) determined that low numbers of Atlantic menhaden, the predominate striped bass prey species within the Chesapeake Bay and along the Atlantic coast,  have affected the growth, health and migration of striped bass.  Since 2004, the CBEF, with assistance from East Carolina University, has examined over 7,000 striped bass from the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean along the Virginia and North Carolina coast.
Data collected by this study indicates that malnutrition observed in 16” to 24” striped bass from Maryland’s section of the Chesapeake Bay (upper Bay) is a consequence of ecological depletion (insufficient numbers of young menhaden less than 10” and bay anchovy).  Malnutrition is also exacerbated by low numbers of other forage species.  CBEF studies of resident and migratory striped bass determined that in most years since 2005, menhaden constituted over 75% of their diet (by weight).  Within the Chesapeake Bay, striped bass growth decreased, a significant percentage of striped bass have mycobacterial infections and striped bass natural mortality rates have risen.
Diminishing striped bass numbers culminated in threatened species status in the upper Bay in 1984 and a fishing moratorium in 1985.  In 1990 the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC), which is responsible for the management of menhaden and striped bass, partially reopened the fishery in state waters and in 1995 declared striped bass fully recovered.  Within the upper Bay a harvest cap was imposed for the first time and the 14” minimum size was raised to 18” (4-5 years of age).  This size limit protected more than 90% of immature female striped bass which historically emigrated to coastal waters and became ocean residents before reaching 18”; only re-entering the Chesapeake Bay on spring spawning migrations after reaching maturity at age 6 or older.  Within ocean waters the minimum size was set at 28” to allow most females to spawn at least once before reaching harvest size.  These actions resulted in a greatly expanded striped bass population, and intensified feeding on menhaden and adult bay anchovy in ocean waters.
During the early 1990s, coincidental with burgeoning striped bass predation on menhaden and bay anchovy, adult menhaden were severely overfished off New England concurrent with intensive fishing by the purse seine reduction fishery (large scale harvest of fish for processing into products such a fish oil and meal) in the Virginia section of the Chesapeake Bay (lower Bay) and in ocean areas from New Jersey to North Carolina.  The Omega Protein Corporation currently owns and operates the only remaining menhaden reduction fishery.  This fishery, the largest on the Atlantic coast, competes with striped bass, fish eating birds and many marine predators.  During 2009 and 2010, approximately 500 million young, immature menhaden (less than 10”), about 43% of the total numbers landed, were harvested in the lower bay and nearby coastal waters by Omega Protein.  These immature menhaden are crucial to the diet of the Bay’s malnourished 16” to 24” striped bass and are supposed to be protected according to ASMFC’s ecological objectives in their Interstate Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic Menhaden.
This study revealed that large numbers of striped bass greater than 28”, predominately females, which historically migrated from summer habitat in New England waters during the fall to feeding grounds in coastal ocean waters off Virginia and North Carolina, now arrive in the upper Bay during late fall and remain through the spring spawning season – a previously undocumented event.  This study also documented a significant increase in the population of immature female striped bass in the upper Bay during October through December of 2010.  These females represented 25% of striped bass in the 18” to 24” range; two times higher than the 12% average in 2008 & 2009 and four times higher than the 6% average in 2006 & 2007.  Immature females in this size range normally inhabit ocean waters and are protected by the 28” minimum size limit.  However, within the Chesapeake Bay, immature female striped bass greater than 18” can be harvested by recreational and commercial fisheries.
Diet analyses, body fat indices and the unprecedented shift in established feeding patterns by migratory striped bass indicate that menhaden and bay anchovy are severely depleted on their coastal feeding grounds.  Consequently, migratory striped bass that over-winter in the Chesapeake Bay are competing with resident striped bass for menhaden of all sizes.
ASMFC decisions that address menhaden overfishing must also resolve the fundamental problem – ecological depletion of Atlantic menhaden in the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean.

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Jan 31 2011

Cool Striped Bass Surf Fishing Video – New York Edition

Published by under Striped Bass

Caught this video today from a link sent by a friend. It is a video made by Peter Laurelli of his 2010 Surf Fly Fishing adventures in and around New York. Cool video worth checking out.

Surf Fishing 2010 – NYC Edition from Peter Laurelli on Vimeo.

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Apr 28 2010

IGFA 20lb Tippet Fly Rod Striped Bass Class Record Approved

IGFA Striped Bass Saltwater Fly Fishing Record in Fly Fishing Clothes Fly Fishing Shirt Company Lateral Line's Fly Fishing BlogA new approved IGFA World Record from Virginia saltwaters. Male 20 pound Tippet Fly Rod Class Striped Bass weighed in at 51lbs, 5oz

Richie Keatley of Norfolk was approved recently as the newest World Record holder from Virginia. The 51lb, 5oz striped bass he boated on the fly at the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel on December 17th, 2010 topped the existing 43lbs, 12oz record previously held by another Virginia resident, Harry Huelsbeck.

Richie was fly fishing in his 22-foot boat at the Bay Bridge Tunnel using a hand-tied 3/0 Clouser blue-tinted fly. After a nerve racking battle and three netting attempts, once again Virginia fishing history was made!
Congratulations Richie!!

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Apr 03 2010

Maryland Trophy Striped Bass Season Trolling Set Ups

Chesapeake Trolling Set up for Trophy Season Striped Bass Fishing in Maryland for all those who are fishing in Maryland this SpringThe Maryland trophy striped bass season is just a few weeks away and with the advent of great weather throughout the Chesapeake anglers are uncovering their boats and have fishing on the mind. While light tackle and fly fishing can be great fun, the preferred method by many anglers is trolling. You can cover a lot of water and with the stripers moving like they are this time of year it is usually a very effective method. Some light tackle and fly anglers employ trolling until they find a school of fish, then shut down the boat and the light tackle fishing anglers start jigging and fly anglers start dredging sinking lines or casting to breaking fish. Here is a great article by one a well known captains, Capt. Mark Galasso, on the Chesapeake where he explains several trolling set ups to get you started this spring on your hunt for that monster striped bass. (Note the link will take you to another site, TidalFish.com, for the full article with illustrations.  Click here for the trolling set ups article)

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Feb 02 2010

Learn the Secrets of Catching Striped Bass with Capt. Richie Gaines

Striped bass seminars chesapeake bay seminar chesapeake fishing guide Richie Gaines light tackle fishing for striped bassJoin Capt. Richie Gaines on Saturday, March 13 at Chesapeake College for a one-day seminar on how to find and catch striped bass (rockfish) throughout the different seasons on the Chesapeake Bay. All levels of anglers are welcome!

Fishing techniques such as trolling, chumming, live lining, and light tackle will be covered along rigging, knots, and equipment selection. Gaines will also share his knowledge on how to find and fish productive locations in the mid Bay.

Captain Richie Gaines has been guiding anglers in the Chesapeake region for over twenty years and has earned the reputation as one of the top light tackle guides on the Bay. He fishes the Bay from the Susquehanna Flats to the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel, moving with the fish to follow the best bite. Gaines serves as President of the Chesapeake Guides Association, is past Chairman of the Maryland Sport Fishing Advisory Commission, and has been featured in several national fishing magazines and television shows.

The course fee for the seminar is $52.00. Participants should bring a brown bag lunch. For registration information, contact Marci Leach at [email protected] or call 410-827-5833.

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Feb 27 2009

Learn the Secrets of Catching Striped Bass with Capt. Richie Gaines on March 28

richie_stripersJoin Capt. Richie Gaines on Saturday, March 28 at Chesapeake College for a one-day seminar on how to find and catch striped bass (rockfish) throughout the different seasons on the Chesapeake Bay. All levels of anglers are welcome!

Fishing techniques such as trolling, chumming, live lining, and light tackle will be covered along rigging, knots, and equipment selection. Gaines will also share his experiences on how to find and fish productive fishing locations across the ent ire Bay.

Captain Richie Gaines has been guiding anglers in the Chesapeake region for over twenty years and has earned the reputation as one of the top light tackle guides on the Bay. For over forty years, he has fished the Bay year-round from the Susquehanna Flats to the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel, moving with the fish to follow the best bite. Gaines serves as President of the Chesapeake Guides Association, is Chairman of the Maryland Sport Fishing Advisory Commission, and has been featured in several national fishing magazines and television shows.

Course fees for the seminar are $52.00 and include a continental breakfast. Participants should bring a brown bag lunch. For registration information, please contact Marci Leach at [email protected] or by calling 410-827-5833.

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