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Jul 11 2012

Cool Fishing T Shirt

Fishing T Shirt by Tidal Fish Chasing Striped BassWe always like to give a shout out to those that pick up the Lateral Line brand. Tidal Fish picked us up in their online fishing store and we found something in addition to their site worth giving a shout out. Their striped bass fishing t-shirt  jumped out at us as pretty cool design. If you are into the saltwater inshore fishing scene and chase striped bass this t-shirt is worth a look. It comes in short sleeve and long sleeve. And while you are surfing their online store make sure you check out the hot new performance fishing t-shirt designs by Lateral Line. They have them up in their fishing shop before we do…. ouch that hurts man. Keep an eye out for them here on the Lateral Line soon.

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Jul 10 2012

Why Lateral Line Cares about Bristol Bay – Please Join Us in Supporting the Effort to Save this Amazing Place

Published by under Fishing News

Save Bristol Bay AlaskaAs a fishing company we are a natural resource dependent business. It’s pretty simple, not only do each of us truly care about our natural resources, but given our dependency on them it’s in our best interest  to help foster healthy fisheries, clean water, and abundant access.  Without fish we have no fishing, with no fishing there is no Lateral Line or any other fishing company for that matter. While we care deeply about the Chesapeake Bay and all it’s tributaries in our back yard, we’ve also traveled to the far ends of the world to chase fish and have deep appreciation for fisheries and ecosystems world wide.

Bristol Bay in Alaska is one of those far off places that deserve our protection.  I’ve been lucky enough to travel and fish some parts of Alaska and it’s one of the most remarkable places in world. It’s wild, it’s big, it’s full of life, clean water, good people and fishing like nowhere else in the world. It’s worth protecting!

Bristol Bay is currently under threat from an effort to develop one of the largest open pit mines ever conceived.  The Pebble mine would be developed at the headwaters of the Kvichak and Nushagak rivers – two world class salmon and trout producing rivers.  An excellent description of the mine and its scale is provided by Trout Unlimited at the following link – http://www.savebristolbay.org/about-the-bay/about-pebble-mine.

We been involved in supporting the effort to save Bristol Bay for several years and we now find ourselves at another critical juncture in the process.  The EPA recently completed a major watershed assessment of the region and the research came out overwhelmingly supporting the belief that the mine would pose a major threat to the fish and wildlife of the region.  The comment period for the watershed assessment is open until July 23rd and I want to encourage you to take a moment to write to President Obama and your congressional delegation to let them know you support the EPA and its assessment.  Click here to take action – www.SaveBristolBay.org/TakeAction.

Thank you from all of us that care about this big amazing wild place.

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Jul 02 2012

Ocean’s of Garbage – Why we are eating our own trash

Published by under Did you know?

An interesting graphic about the world’s ocean’s and trash. Even if you only believe it’s 50% true, it’s pretty scarey to think what is happening to the oceans. You can click on the graphic
Ocean of Garbage
Created by: MastersDegree.net

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Jun 13 2012

Big Redfish Fishing in Virginia’s Chesapeake Bay

Redfish fishing Virginia Chesapeake Bay fishing reportNine year old shows how redfishing is done fishing report

This nine year old told his Dad he was ready to hit the water for some redfishing in the Chesapeake. Keep in mind it was his first time going fishing for red drum. Sure enough this young angler put a hurting on the the fish. Nice work man, you’re going to be one heck of an angler, we’re looking forward to more pictures and fishing reports.  Check this link for more pictures and the whole fishing report.

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Oct 24 2011

Lateral Line Seen on the Rio Paraná River

Golden Dorado Rio Parana Fly Fishing

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Mar 14 2011

Check out Jed on Trout Unlimited’s On the Rise TV Show

Published by under Fishing News

Jed Fiebelkorn Trout Unlimited On the Rise TV Show on Fishing Clothing site by Lateral LineCheck out Jed Fiebelkorn, one of our Lateral Line Ambassadors, as he hosts Trout Unlimited’s: On the Rise. The show airs on The Sportsman Channel.
Upcoming shows to check out:
All Times Eastern
Mon. 3/28 @ 10AM
Tue. 3/29 @ 8PM
Sun. 4/3 @ 3:30PM
(In the picture is Jed with a striped bass he caught on the fly while fishing with us in the southern Chesapeake Bay)

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Feb 23 2011

Report Finds Menhaden Decline Effects Health and Migration of Striped Bass

Striped Bass Patterns change because of lack of menhadenAn ongoing study by the Chesapeake Bay Ecological Foundation (CBEF) determined that low numbers of Atlantic menhaden, the predominate striped bass prey species within the Chesapeake Bay and along the Atlantic coast,  have affected the growth, health and migration of striped bass.  Since 2004, the CBEF, with assistance from East Carolina University, has examined over 7,000 striped bass from the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean along the Virginia and North Carolina coast.
Data collected by this study indicates that malnutrition observed in 16” to 24” striped bass from Maryland’s section of the Chesapeake Bay (upper Bay) is a consequence of ecological depletion (insufficient numbers of young menhaden less than 10” and bay anchovy).  Malnutrition is also exacerbated by low numbers of other forage species.  CBEF studies of resident and migratory striped bass determined that in most years since 2005, menhaden constituted over 75% of their diet (by weight).  Within the Chesapeake Bay, striped bass growth decreased, a significant percentage of striped bass have mycobacterial infections and striped bass natural mortality rates have risen.
Diminishing striped bass numbers culminated in threatened species status in the upper Bay in 1984 and a fishing moratorium in 1985.  In 1990 the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC), which is responsible for the management of menhaden and striped bass, partially reopened the fishery in state waters and in 1995 declared striped bass fully recovered.  Within the upper Bay a harvest cap was imposed for the first time and the 14” minimum size was raised to 18” (4-5 years of age).  This size limit protected more than 90% of immature female striped bass which historically emigrated to coastal waters and became ocean residents before reaching 18”; only re-entering the Chesapeake Bay on spring spawning migrations after reaching maturity at age 6 or older.  Within ocean waters the minimum size was set at 28” to allow most females to spawn at least once before reaching harvest size.  These actions resulted in a greatly expanded striped bass population, and intensified feeding on menhaden and adult bay anchovy in ocean waters.
During the early 1990s, coincidental with burgeoning striped bass predation on menhaden and bay anchovy, adult menhaden were severely overfished off New England concurrent with intensive fishing by the purse seine reduction fishery (large scale harvest of fish for processing into products such a fish oil and meal) in the Virginia section of the Chesapeake Bay (lower Bay) and in ocean areas from New Jersey to North Carolina.  The Omega Protein Corporation currently owns and operates the only remaining menhaden reduction fishery.  This fishery, the largest on the Atlantic coast, competes with striped bass, fish eating birds and many marine predators.  During 2009 and 2010, approximately 500 million young, immature menhaden (less than 10”), about 43% of the total numbers landed, were harvested in the lower bay and nearby coastal waters by Omega Protein.  These immature menhaden are crucial to the diet of the Bay’s malnourished 16” to 24” striped bass and are supposed to be protected according to ASMFC’s ecological objectives in their Interstate Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic Menhaden.
This study revealed that large numbers of striped bass greater than 28”, predominately females, which historically migrated from summer habitat in New England waters during the fall to feeding grounds in coastal ocean waters off Virginia and North Carolina, now arrive in the upper Bay during late fall and remain through the spring spawning season – a previously undocumented event.  This study also documented a significant increase in the population of immature female striped bass in the upper Bay during October through December of 2010.  These females represented 25% of striped bass in the 18” to 24” range; two times higher than the 12% average in 2008 & 2009 and four times higher than the 6% average in 2006 & 2007.  Immature females in this size range normally inhabit ocean waters and are protected by the 28” minimum size limit.  However, within the Chesapeake Bay, immature female striped bass greater than 18” can be harvested by recreational and commercial fisheries.
Diet analyses, body fat indices and the unprecedented shift in established feeding patterns by migratory striped bass indicate that menhaden and bay anchovy are severely depleted on their coastal feeding grounds.  Consequently, migratory striped bass that over-winter in the Chesapeake Bay are competing with resident striped bass for menhaden of all sizes.
ASMFC decisions that address menhaden overfishing must also resolve the fundamental problem – ecological depletion of Atlantic menhaden in the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean.

An ongoing study by the Chesapeake Bay Ecological Foundation (CBEF) determined that low numbers of Atlantic menhaden, the predominate striped bass prey species within the Chesapeake Bay and along the Atlantic coast,  have affected the growth, health and migration of striped bass.  Since 2004, the CBEF, with assistance from East Carolina University, has examined over 7,000 striped bass from the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean along the Virginia and North Carolina coast.
Data collected by this study indicates that malnutrition observed in 16” to 24” striped bass from Maryland’s section of the Chesapeake Bay (upper Bay) is a consequence of ecological depletion (insufficient numbers of young menhaden less than 10” and bay anchovy).  Malnutrition is also exacerbated by low numbers of other forage species.  CBEF studies of resident and migratory striped bass determined that in most years since 2005, menhaden constituted over 75% of their diet (by weight).  Within the Chesapeake Bay, striped bass growth decreased, a significant percentage of striped bass have mycobacterial infections and striped bass natural mortality rates have risen.
Diminishing striped bass numbers culminated in threatened species status in the upper Bay in 1984 and a fishing moratorium in 1985.  In 1990 the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC), which is responsible for the management of menhaden and striped bass, partially reopened the fishery in state waters and in 1995 declared striped bass fully recovered.  Within the upper Bay a harvest cap was imposed for the first time and the 14” minimum size was raised to 18” (4-5 years of age).  This size limit protected more than 90% of immature female striped bass which historically emigrated to coastal waters and became ocean residents before reaching 18”; only re-entering the Chesapeake Bay on spring spawning migrations after reaching maturity at age 6 or older.  Within ocean waters the minimum size was set at 28” to allow most females to spawn at least once before reaching harvest size.  These actions resulted in a greatly expanded striped bass population, and intensified feeding on menhaden and adult bay anchovy in ocean waters.
During the early 1990s, coincidental with burgeoning striped bass predation on menhaden and bay anchovy, adult menhaden were severely overfished off New England concurrent with intensive fishing by the purse seine reduction fishery (large scale harvest of fish for processing into products such a fish oil and meal) in the Virginia section of the Chesapeake Bay (lower Bay) and in ocean areas from New Jersey to North Carolina.  The Omega Protein Corporation currently owns and operates the only remaining menhaden reduction fishery.  This fishery, the largest on the Atlantic coast, competes with striped bass, fish eating birds and many marine predators.  During 2009 and 2010, approximately 500 million young, immature menhaden (less than 10”), about 43% of the total numbers landed, were harvested in the lower bay and nearby coastal waters by Omega Protein.  These immature menhaden are crucial to the diet of the Bay’s malnourished 16” to 24” striped bass and are supposed to be protected according to ASMFC’s ecological objectives in their Interstate Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic Menhaden.
This study revealed that large numbers of striped bass greater than 28”, predominately females, which historically migrated from summer habitat in New England waters during the fall to feeding grounds in coastal ocean waters off Virginia and North Carolina, now arrive in the upper Bay during late fall and remain through the spring spawning season – a previously undocumented event.  This study also documented a significant increase in the population of immature female striped bass in the upper Bay during October through December of 2010.  These females represented 25% of striped bass in the 18” to 24” range; two times higher than the 12% average in 2008 & 2009 and four times higher than the 6% average in 2006 & 2007.  Immature females in this size range normally inhabit ocean waters and are protected by the 28” minimum size limit.  However, within the Chesapeake Bay, immature female striped bass greater than 18” can be harvested by recreational and commercial fisheries.
Diet analyses, body fat indices and the unprecedented shift in established feeding patterns by migratory striped bass indicate that menhaden and bay anchovy are severely depleted on their coastal feeding grounds.  Consequently, migratory striped bass that over-winter in the Chesapeake Bay are competing with resident striped bass for menhaden of all sizes.
ASMFC decisions that address menhaden overfishing must also resolve the fundamental problem – ecological depletion of Atlantic menhaden in the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean.

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Feb 14 2011

Tie Fest 2011 Report and Pictures

Published by under Fishing News,Fly Tying

I was glad to be home this year to attend Tie Fest 2011 this past Saturday. Tie Fest started as a small gathering of fly fishing and fly tying enthusiasts in a basement on the western shore of the Maryland Chesapeake Bay. The vent grew to take over a fly shop on Kent Island for a day a year and finally over the last few years had to be moved to the Kent Island Yacht Club. The event is now put on and sponsored by the Kent Island CCA chapter. The event is designed to be pure, that means admission is free to attend. The event attracts the best of the best fly anglers and fly tiers from around the world. We are talking the likes of anglers like Lefty Kreh, Bob Clouser, Bob Popovics and many other great fly tiers. You can get one one time fly tying demonstrations and advice as well as casting demonstrations and advice by Lefty.

As always it was a great turn out. I snapped some pictures while spending some time at the show for your viewing enjoyment. Good seeing everyone and catching up, look forward to seeing everyone on the water this year and at the 2012 Tie Fest next year!
(You can enlarge the images by clicking on them; they will open in a new window. All photos taken by Brandon White and may not be used or reproduced with out express written permission)

The first picture sums up the spirit of the event, everyone learns from one another (those not familiar, in the picture is fly fishing legend Lefty Kreh on the right, Bob Clouser (creator of the clouser minnow) standing up and Bob Popovics (said to be one of the most innovative saltwater fly tiers ever) at the fly tying vice.

Bob Popovics fly tying Bob Clouser of Clouser Minnow and Lefty Kreh looking on

Bob Popovics fly tying

Bob Popovics fly tying Surf Candy Fly Saltwater Fly Fishing Fly

Bob Popovics fly tying

Bob Popovics fly tying Surf Candy at Tie Fest Fly Fishing Show

Bob Popovics Saltwater Flies Surf Candy Fly

Fly Tying Tie Fest

Fly Tying Materials at Tie Fest Lateral Line Fishing Hat spotted

Saltwater Fly for Saltwater Fly Fishing at Tie Fest

Capt. Chris Newsome Fly Fishing Fly

Fly Tying

Fishing Hat Bob Clouser edition

Lefty Kreh Fly Casting Lesson Fly Casting Demonstration

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